Lassie


Lassie
September 2021

This quanket combines many scraps from Toodles, a quilt I made for my nephew Dexter, six years ago. The colorway is very mid-century modern. The avocado, browns, teals and oranges have made these fabrics a bit of a challenge to incorporate into other quilts over the past six years, not only because of their strong color personality, but also because the colors are all very saturated. I felt the linen color for the background provided the neutrality needed to compliment these strong colors.

This scrappy quilt began by sewing the small’ish scraps (most under 4″x3″), combining them with the solid linen and avocado colored fabrics. I constructed 12″ blocks, but wasn’t happy with how they looked once they were up on my design wall*. So, I used a trick I learned many year’s ago when making Calm Reflection, of cutting the block in half, and flipping it around to create a new design. The technique was one I had found on wont-to-be quilter’s blog, however, I can no longer find the instructions there. Please drop me a comment with your email address if you would like me to send to you. I made ‘Lassie’ as a quanket, finishing it with fleece backing.

“Did you ever see a lassie go this way and that (way)?”
~ Roud Folk Song Index number 5040

This quanket will be donated for a child in foster care.

*While the picture of my design wall doesn’t have this latest quanket on it, I thought you might like to see what my design wall looks like. It is a piece of 1/2″ styrofoam insulation covered with felt, measuring roughly 5’x6′. My murphy-style cutting table is immediately behind my sewing machine, a 1950’s Singer 401a, slant-o-matic. The cabinet for the fold-up cutting table has a blackboard backing, so I can keep notes for my current projects. The sewing machine was my grandmothers, and the one she used to teach me to sew over 50 years ago.

M82


M82
August 2021

The cream fabric in this scrappy quilt is leftover from my Firsts quilt while the blues were pulled from my bottomless blue scraps bin. I organize my scraps by color, and it seems that no matter how many times I create scrappy blue quilts, this bin is always full! I created the scrappy blocks by sewing seven, 1.5″ x 7.5″ strips, and then combining a cream block to make the half square rectangles (HSTs).

I love the versatility of HSTs. Just a simple rotation, or placement of fabric and color can make it look completely different from something made in the same quilt design. I’m not certain if there is a name for this particular design. I use EQ8 and designed it there, basing it off a Lonestar design. I love the look of an off centered Lonestar, such as I did with Rising Star, and in this case I chose to not complete it out to the star points, but instead kept it extremely ‘zoomed in’. I made this as a quanket, finishing it with fleece backing.

This will be donated for a child in foster care.

W00t


W00t
May 2021

The design for this baby quilt began with the owl fabric, that I fussy cut to showcase the owls. It will be donated as part of this year’s Hands2Help Challenge being hosted by Sarah over at Confessions of a Fabric Addict @fabricaddictquilts. The cute owl fabric is the last of this fabric which I had previously used in Hoots, which went to Little Lambs Foundation for Kids for the 2018 Hands2Help challenge. This quilt is also heading off to Little Lambs Foundation for Kids @littlelambsfoundationforkids for this year’s challenge.

The log cabin blocks were made from yellow and teal scraps. I like to store my scraps by color, in photo boxes. While some people prefer to precut their scraps to common sizes, I do not cut my scraps before putting in the boxes, but just leave them whatever size/shape they are. I find this gives me more flexibility for future projects.

#h2h2021 #hands2help2021

Echoes


Echoes
May 2021

Here’s a baby quilt that will be donated to Little Lambs Foundation for Kids @littlelambsfoundationforkids as part of this year’s Hands2Help Challenge being hosted by Sarah over at Confessions of a Fabric Addict @fabricaddictquilts.

The fabric of the animals riding around in cars is the last I have of this fabric, which I also used in Twizzler Goes for a Ride and Toodles. The blue, cream-colored and dark green blocks are all solid fabrics, which is deceiving since the fleece I used for the backing on this quanket (blanket + quilt = quanket) shows through when held up to light. The fleece backing is green with big white polka dots, making an interesting echo from the back to the front.

Fun fact: the letter E in the NATO phonetic alphabet is Echo and its morse code is a dot.

#h2h2021 #hands2help2021

M81


M81
April 2021

While it has been quiet here on my blog for the past few months, my sewing room has been anything but quiet! I’ve been working on improving my quilting skills, which I like to do on smaller-sized items, as they are more manageable on my standard domestic sewing machine. I made four table runners, shown in the picture below. The Valentine ones were for each of my daughters, the blue one was for my youngest daughter’s birthday, and the one that looks like a serapa blanket was for me. I have also been working on a couple of larger quilts, which have been keeping my sewing days busy.

I’ve slowed down a little on making charity quilts over the past few months, as due to Covid, my local county’s Children and Family services has been closed to visitors, so dropping off my donation quilts has been a challenge. Luckily, Sarah over at Confessions of a Fabric Addict @fabricaddictquilts is currently hosting the Hands2Help Challenge, and Little Lambs Foundation for Kids @littlelambsfoundationforkids is once again one of the receiving participants, which is where this baby quilt is heading.

This scrappy quilt incorporates an orphan block from my Hoplon quilt as the center block. The Valentine table runners I made used the crumb block technique — which by the way is super fun — and since I had all my pink scraps thrown on my sewing table, I decided to just keep making pink crumb blocks, which I used for the setting triangles. I attempted doing a fish scale quilting design (free motion), and while it ended up looking more like squares with arced sides, I was happy with the end result.

#h2h2021 #hands2help2021

Mesozoic Scraps


Mesozoic Scraps
October 2020

I have made several quilts and quankets this year using mainly scraps, making me think scraps must be genetically related to rabbits, because they multiply so quickly! My gray, white and black scrap bin was still too full for the lid to sit on it properly, so I made this string quanket. I had the green fleece for the backing in my stash, so I pulled in some green scraps leftover from my recent Tiger Tracks project to add a bit of fun color for the top. I also incorporated a few fussy cut squares of dinosaur fabric leftover from my Prehistoric Pennies quanket to add a bit of whimsy.

This was donated to the County of Ventura, Children & Family Services for a child in foster care in October 2020.

Phillip


Phillip
September 2020

Here’s my blue version from Jacquelynne Steves Silver Linings SAL (sew along) that I participated in during the Spring. Like my pink version, Aurora, I stitched an owl to work with my overall owl theme. But instead of embroidering the owl this time, I did it as cross-stitch, since I’m much more familiar with cross stitching — much fewer stitches to know/learn than embroidery 🙂

I used scraps for all the blocks, and fabric from my stash for the sashing, cornerstones and binding. The blocks are 6″ and since the SAL only had twelve blocks, plus six embroidery blocks that I chose not to do, I pieced extra blocks to make the finished size 40″x46″ so it can work for a baby or young child.

This was donated to the County of Ventura, Children & Family Services for a child in foster care in October 2020.

Aurora


Aurora
August 2020

Back in May, I joined Jacquelynne Steves Silver Linings QAL (quilt along). Each Monday, she would release a new block, for a total of twelve. There were also six  optional embroidery blocks as part of the project. Since I’m not overly familiar with embroidery, I only did one embroidered block. I used a coloring page for the pattern, and did an owl to work with my overall owl theme. Although the group QAL is ending this week, there is still time to download the block patterns here.

The first block was a nine patch, which I fussy cut the center square from scrap owl fabric leftover from my quanket Hooty. The owls are in different colors, including pink, which began my colorway for this quilt. I used scraps for all the pink blocks, and fabric from my stash for the borders and binding. The blocks are 6″ and since the QAL only had twelve blocks, plus the embroidery, I pieced an extra seven blocks to make the finished size 40″x46″ so it can work for a baby or young child.

As I suspect with many people, the pandemic has become a depressing pall over daily life. The hardest thing for me has been the infrequency of seeing and spending time with family and friends. And when I do see them, it’s at a safe social distance, so no hugs 😦 The not being able to plan for parties, camping trips, vacations, etc. is particularly difficult for me, since I so enjoy planning for the next big adventure! In a nutshell, the inability to ‘look forward’ to something concrete has been the biggest loss (for me) as a result of the pandemic. This QAL has been a breath of fresh air during this difficult time, as while it was just a small thing, it gave me something to look forward to each week. 

The name Aurora means dawn. For mariners, a pink/red sky in the morning is a warning of a potential storm. While a storm at sea can be scary, if a sailor uses the scientific knowledge of prevailing winds, along with the fact that a pink/red sky in the morning could indicate a high pressure system to the east, and a possible impending storm, then they can take the necessary precautions to be better prepared to ride out the storm. The pandemic can certainly be likened to a storm, and if we rely on the scientific facts and take the necessary precautions, we will get through this!

This was donated to the County of Ventura, Children & Family Services for a child in foster care in October 2020.

Yellow Ribbon


Yellow Ribbon
June 2020

In 2012, I began this journey of making quilts for kids in the foster system and Yellow Ribbon marks my 100th donation quilt. I had inherited a lot of fabric after my Mom passed away, and while I had no urgent need for fabric at that time, as someone dedicated to recycling/reducing/reusing/repurposing, I figured I could put it to use, and ultimately decided I would make quilts to give to foster kids. I always try to incorporate a piece of fabric that was from my Mom, Granny, Mother-in-law Edith, or Aunt Betty, but in the past year it’s becoming more difficult, as the stash I inherited has dwindled considerably! For this, I used my yellow, white, grey and black scraps, so there are a lot of pieces of the past fabric in it.

I have been making quilts since the ’80’s, but have never been what I would consider a hard core quilter, and I still don’t actually consider myself a typical quilter. I love the piecing aspect of the quilting process, but the sandwiching batting and then stitching/quilting has been something I’ve only started doing more of in the past two years. I usually back my tops with fleece, and tie them, which is a process that just seems to work really well for me. If you’re interested in the process, check out my posts about making a quanket:

This was donated to the County of Ventura, Children & Family Services for a child in foster care in June 2020.

Cutting Corners


Cutting Corners
May 2020

The scraps bins have really been a lifesaver these past few months of safer at home. I’ve made a good dent on my yellows (stay tuned for my next post for this one), my black/grey/white, and now my blues. I am also participating in Jacquelynne Steves Silver Linings QAL (quilt along) that started a couple of weeks ago and I will be making two baby quilts with the completed blocks: one in a pink colorway and one in a blue, using fabric from my scraps bins. There is still time to join her quilt along here.

There are so many pieces of the past fabric in this one, which is usually the case when I dig in on the scraps bins! The jump-off fabric that informed my design direction is the larger border of blue and red/burgandy flowers (blast from the past quiz for my daughters to see if they remember where I had used this back in the late 80’s). Of note, there are fabrics from both Edith (the red/burgandy) and from Granny (the edge binding). I used the same method for building the blocks as I did for Ziggy, using dryer sheets as the foundation. This time I trimmed the dryer sheets to squares as opposed to leaving them rectangular. My sewing room always smells so good when I am using used dryer sheets as foundation 🙂

I had two names I considered for this quanket: this, and Infinity Mirrors. While a ‘cutting corners’ behavior is generally not considered desirable, I think that sometimes the efficiencies gained by cutting a corner outweigh what was “cut” in the cutting of that corner. What do you think?

This was donated to the County of Ventura, Children & Family Services for a child in foster care in June 2020.