Cutting Corners


Cutting Corners
May 2020

The scraps bins have really been a lifesaver these past few months of safer at home. I’ve made a good dent on my yellows (stay tuned for my next post for this one), my black/grey/white, and now my blues. I am also participating in Jacquelynne Steves Silver Linings QAL (quilt along) that started a couple of weeks ago and I will be making two baby quilts with the completed blocks: one in a pink colorway and one in a blue, using fabric from my scraps bins. There is still time to join her quilt along here.

There are so many pieces of the past fabric in this one, which is usually the case when I dig in on the scraps bins! The jump-off fabric that informed my design direction is the larger border of blue and red/burgandy flowers (blast from the past quiz for my daughters to see if they remember where I had used this back in the late 80’s). Of note, there are fabrics from both Edith (the red/burgandy) and from Granny (the edge binding). I used the same method for building the blocks as I did for Ziggy, using dryer sheets as the foundation. This time I trimmed the dryer sheets to squares as opposed to leaving them rectangular. My sewing room always smells so good when I am using used dryer sheets as foundation 🙂

I had two names I considered for this quanket: this, and Infinity Mirrors. While a ‘cutting corners’ behavior is generally not considered desirable, I think that sometimes the efficiencies gained by cutting a corner outweigh what was “cut” in the cutting of that corner. What do you think?

This will be donated to the County of Ventura, Children & Family Services for a child in foster care.

Land’s Edge


Land’s Edge
March 2019

Back in January I tackled my blue scraps bin and created the Bargello twist and turn quilt I named 3273 K. Of the 500 scrappy blue rectangles I cut for that project, I still had about 100 left. So instead of trying to cram them back into my scraps bin, I pulled out all my skinny blue and brown string scraps and made this! No pattern, just winging it 😉

There are so many different fabrics in this quanket, I wouldn’t know where to start to list which ones are “pieces of the past” – heck, I guess they’re all technically “pieces of the past” since they’re all from past projects! I plan to link this to the weekly linky party over at Quilting is more fun than Housework. Pop over to see all the other great scappy projects others have been working on.

Quilting is more fun than Housework

This was donated to the County of Ventura, Children & Family Services in March 2019, for a foster child.

Baby Bear

Charity quilts for foster kids

Baby Bear
April 2016

Baby Bear is the final quanket in my Three Bears series, and I am thrilled to have it finished in time to include it, along with Papa and Mama Bear, in this year’s Hands2Help Charity Quilt Challenge.

I have had little time to spend at the sewing machine over the past few months, however I did take some time recently to better organize my scraps. While I am not quite as organized as other quilters in cutting my scraps into commonly used sizes, I do keep my scraps together by colors. My prior method of keeping them in plastic bags was beginning to get out of hand and needless to say, it looked tacky. So I purchased some cute photo boxes that were on clearance, and have now organized my scraps into these. They look much cuter on the shelf and work much better than the plastic bags did. During the process of organizing, I found that my blue scraps were overflowing, which is what inspired the fabric selection for Baby Bear.

Designing a scrappy quilt, while challenging, is fun and rewarding. Challenges include finding enough scraps in similar or complementary color values and/or saturation, and designing the layout. For me, the layout is usually dictated by the amount of scraps I have that work together. In Baby Bear, I had a lot of country blues – leftovers from the 80’s – and darker blue leftovers from my quanket, Celebration. Using a design wall is great for exploring options in how to arrange blocks, sashing and borders. My design wall is a closet door covered with felt which works great, as it lets me place pieces without the use of pins. For pieces that have more seams, it seems that a pin is needed, otherwise I end up with a pile of pieces on the floor in front of the closet door!

Hands2Help Charity Quilt Challenge
Quilting is more fun than Housework