Onshore Breeze

Onshore Breeze
August 2020

When I can’t sail, I quilt. My husband and I have been sailors for over 30 years, so naturally, when the grandkids came on the scene, we taught them that a nice onshore breeze is synonymous with good sailing. We often say, “Nice onshore breeze, we should go sailing!” Now that they are a bit older, we merely start the sentence, “Nice onshore breeze”, and they finish it 🙂

 

I made this quilt as a gift for my granddaughter’s 4th birthday which was earlier this month. When trying to get ideas for a design, I asked her what her favorite color is (blue, at that moment) and her favorite animal (cow, at that moment). I opted to design around her favorite color, as while I like cows, they were just not sparking much creative inspiration for me.

 

But, I didn’t have much in the way of blue fabric left in my stash (no cows either). With more time on my hands during the past several months, my stash has been substantially depleted. The pandemic has also made fabric acquisition very challenging! I was able to order three jelly rolls – two in a blue colorway, and one in aqua, however getting solid fabrics has been nearly impossible – both online and in stores! Where once there had been a dozen or two of various Kona solids on the store shelves, now there are seldom more than a half dozen. Fortunately, on one of my rare trips to the fabric store in the past two months, they happened to have turquoise Kona fabric. Needless to say, I scooped some up right quick to use for the back. I incorporated the leftover fabric from the front to create a strip down the back, which helped get around the issue of the solid fabric being only 45″ wide and my needing 54″ for the width. Warning for fellow quilters (in case you haven’t already found this out): the jelly rolls were supposed to be 2.5″ wide, however they were not! I am so glad that I checked them before I began assembling. The blue rolls were 2.75″ while the aqua was 2.625″. So, I trimmed the blue to be the same as the aqua.

 

As with the past few quilts I’ve made, I did this using the quilt as you go (QAYG) method. I built the quilt in three horizontal panels roughly 20″ x 54″, so quilting it on my domestic machine was much easier. I kept the quilting pretty simple, doing wavy lines. Because the front reminds me of ocean waves, my intention for the wavy lines was to emulate an onshore breeze across the water.

Fancy Fox

Fancy Fox
July 2020

After experimenting with the quilt as you go (QAYG) method on my recent quilt Persistence, I continued practicing the technique here on Fancy Fox. However, instead of quilting each individual block, I quilted two rows at a time, which I liked better, especially since I prefer to hand stitch the back seam of each joined panel. I had originally planned six rows, but in the midst of making it, I decided to gift it to my grandson who likes foxes. So, I added a seventh row to make it a better length for his twin-sized bed.

 

The fox fabric was fairly new, while all the other fabrics were leftovers from other quilt projects.

 

Persistence

Persistence
July 2020

I’ve been working on this off and on since January 2019. Life got crazy in 2019 with my daughter diagnosed with breast cancer, so this got put to the back burner. I am calling this Persistence, in recognition of my daughter’s fight with cancer, and for this quilt challenging my quilting and sewing capabilities to the max! Today is my daughter’s 1 year cancer-free, cancerversary.

 

“Never lose hope. Storms make people stronger and never last forever.” ― Roy T. Bennett

 

I had received ‘The Quilt Block Bible’ (Rosemary Youngs) the Christmas before, and wanted to play with making different blocks to create a sampler quilt. Well, why not try it as a QAYG method, something I hadn’t tried until then. And, why not throw in a Mola as the center block, which is a different size format. What was I thinking?!?

 

“Do not fear failure but rather fear not trying.” ― Roy T. Bennett

 

Most of the fabrics were newly purchased fat quarters, but there are some pieces of the past fabric in there too. Each block has a different orange fabric backing, using leftover fabric from the front blocks. After adding the sashing (stitch in ditch on front, seam shows on back), I was not happy with the seam showing on the back. So, I ripped them out and hand sewed all my back seams. Then, I thought I had done enough quilting on top, but when I washed, I realized I should have done more quilting in the piano key border, as the batting there rolled, requiring me to rip open some of the edge binding to get in and lay it flat again. Then back to the machine to add quilting to the border to make the batting stay in place. So, as you can see, Persistence is a fine name for this!

 

“It doesn’t matter how many times you get knocked down. All that matters is you get up one more time than you were knocked down.” ― Roy T. Bennett